USA – Family remembers Wilmington, Delaware man’s last hours before Taser shots (2013-07-24)

Published on July 24 2013 by admin

[[SUMMARY / COMMENTS : Deomain Hayman, 28, died at about 9 p.m. Sunday after officers twice used a stun gun against the man a city police spokesman said was “actively resisting arrest.” He was tasered, had trouble breathing. 300-lb Mr Hayman is described as was a loner who struggled with a learning disability that prevented him from being able to read, and was content going to a nearby Baptist church, barbecuing chicken for himself and loved ones … ]]

Delaware online

Police say vehicle violation touched off chase that ended in Taser shots

James Hayman spent Sunday with his brother Deomain and his family, watching movies and wolfing down hamburgers at their home in Wilmington’s old Ninth Ward.

About 8 p.m. Deomain and his wife, Lindsey, drove off to get milk for their three children, James said. They were headed to the Acme supermarket in Trolley Square, a few miles away.

An hour later, James recalled Tuesday, he got a frantic call from Lindsey. He heard her yell something about the police. “In the background I heard the cops say, ‘Get down’ and then the phone cut off,” James said.

He didn’t hear from Lindsey again until about 1 a.m., when she walked in alone, crying.

“Is he OK?” James asked.

“No,” she replied.

“Where’s my brother? Is he at the police station?” he asked.

“No. He’s dead,” Lindsey said.

Deomain Hayman, 28, died at about 9 p.m. Sunday after officers twice used a stun gun against the man a city police spokesman said was “actively resisting arrest.”

Police said Hayman led police on a high-speed chase about 8:10 p.m. when they tried to pull over the minivan that he was driving for a registration violation near 25th and Madison streets, a few blocks from his home on West 29th Street.

Police abandoned the chase, spokesman Cpl. Mark Ivey said, but officers were later flagged down by witnesses who reported that a car was driving recklessly near the Augustine Cut-off.

Officers found Hayman in the 1700 block of Wawaset St., about a mile from where police tried to stop the van, police said. He became combative and police deployed Tasers, said Ivey, who said both malfunctioned, with one missing Hayman’s nearly 400-pound frame and the other striking his right shoulder.

Ivey said he could not specify exactly what the malfunction was.

It took four officers and several sets of handcuffs to take Hayman into custody, Ivey said, and he was placed in a seated position on the ground. Minutes later, he had trouble breathing and appeared to go into cardiac arrest, police said.

Officers removed his handcuffs, started cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, and applied a defibrillator, Ivey said, but could not revive Hayman, who was rushed to Wilmington Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Authorities have not released the cause and manner of Hayman’s death.

Lindsey would not agree to be interviewed, but James said she told him that during the confrontation she screamed at officers: “Don’t tase him. He’s got a bad heart.” James said Lindsey told him she repeated the request three times but officers ignored her.

Family members said that besides Hayman’s heart condition, he also suffered from sleep apnea, anxiety and took several medications for ailments. He was frequently hospitalized, they said.

After Hayman was in custody, he said, “Baby, I feel like I’m going to die,” James said Lindsey told him.

James said she also told him Hayman had a large lump on his forehead and a scratch on his nose from the altercation with police.

James said Deomain still didn’t have a license or insurance on the van when he ventured out Sunday night. Though Ivey said the police preliminary investigation verified that Deomain led officers on a chase, his brother and parents had trouble believing he would put his wife and other residents in danger by racing around Wilmington’s narrow streets.

Ivey would not comment on the family’s account, saying that police will conduct a thorough investigation of the incident and the circumstances surrounding Hayman’s death.

James and his parents, Denise Hayman and Russell Harmon, spoke Tuesday about the death of a man they knew as a gentle giant and family man who did not deal in drugs or engage in violence like so many young men in Wilmington’s violent streets.

Deomain’s only arrest was in 2010, when he was charged with resisting arrest during a traffic stop.

They said Hayman was a loner who struggled with a learning disability that prevented him from being able to read, and was content going to a nearby Baptist church, barbecuing chicken for himself and loved ones, and taking his chidren to Chuck E. Cheese’s and amusement parks. He and Lindsey were married about nine years and had a son and two daughters, ages 5 through 9. He also had a daughter with another woman.

“My baby was a homebody guy,” Denise Hayman said of her son. “He was never the type to be on the streets.”

Though Hayman aspired to be a police officer as a youth, “he was always terrified of cops,” his mother said. “I don’t know why.”

During the 2010 traffic stop, James said, his brother got out of the car and ran inside a house.

James, who said he was at that scene, said he warned cops not to use their Tasers because of his brother’s heart condition and they relented before taking him into custody peacefully.

In that case, court records showed, Hayman pleaded guilty to resisting arrest and two charges – driving without a valid license or proof of insurance – were dropped in a deal with prosecutors.

His family said that while he probably panicked Sunday, they doubt he instigated a fight with Wilmington police.

“When he gets nervous, he gets tense but he wouldn’t swing. He shakes real bad,” said Russell Harmon.

“I don’t think he deserved that at all,” Hayman’s father added.

http://www.delawareonline.com/article/20130724/NEWS/307240032/Family-remembers-Wilmington-man-s-last-hours-before-Taser-shotsc

 

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